Council drags heels on hooker restrictions

(Knuckles County) Despite the urgings of established citizen clusters, civil liberties factions, night owls, early risers, bar flies and congregations the Mañana town Council has yet to make a decision on street walkers.

The illicit behavior, in the crosshairs since money for sex became illegal here in 1944, has always been brushed aside by deniers, while remaining a whisper by patrons. Now lawmakers must decide whether to tolerate this kind of behavior within town limits.

Fathers and mothers don’t talk about that kind of thing but that doesn’t make it go away. Local interest is constant with activity increasing with booms and yet holding its own during recessions.

“The burr in my saddle is that despite the presence of this questionable industry in our midst we get no revenue,” said Mayor Julie Pettifogger. I’d like to see the matter settled one way or the other with the benefit of street walker taxes or registration fees so as to improve the town coffer.”

Scores of citizens favor outlawing hookers but admit that that has never worked before. Numerous others say legislating morality won’t remove the situation in that demand dictates market practices even in this shady commerce.

“We will continue our vigil and do nothing,” said the mayor. “A new council will be seated in 2020. Maybe they can make headway. Meanwhile so many others sell themselves for money without taking off their clothes. Hypocrisy reigns.”

In other news:

The much-lambasted Colona curfew, lifted after 40 years this month, allows the Colonese the right to walk around after dark. Although traffic is immeasurable at present, town fathers and mothers project a surge in pedestrian behavior. Many strollers, however, remain hesitant to test their new freedoms.

A strong cross-section of those interviewed said they liked the curfew while others found it unreasonably restrictive in that it does not curtail the movement of wild animals allegedly living in the forests and mesas nearby.

– Melvin O’Toole

Filed Under: Lifestyles at Risk

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